Israel: Iran nuclear deal ‘a blessing and a curse’

Iran says it will restart all nuclear facilities under a landmark deal that eased sanctions in exchange for curbs on its nuclear program.

The agreement is expected to lift restrictions that crippled Iran’s economy and give it the ability to pursue enrichment of uranium for weapons, as well as the removal of economic restrictions and restrictions on international travel.

Under the deal, Iran would have to reduce its nuclear activities in return for curbing its nuclear ambitions.

The Islamic Republic has been negotiating with world powers for months to resolve a crippling six-year standoff over its nuclear weapons program.

It said Sunday it will resume nuclear work as soon as the deal is signed by the new administration.

A senior Iranian official said in a statement that Iran will restart enrichment plants under the deal and that the first stage of the program is scheduled to begin within one month.

Under Saturday’s deal, Tehran would not be allowed to produce uranium for civilian purposes.

But under the new deal, it will be allowed a limited amount of enrichment, as long as it does not produce weapons-grade material.

The deal also allows for Iran to restart nuclear facilities it had shut down.

The Islamic Republic said Sunday that the country will restart some of its enrichment facilities under the agreement and that it will do so soon.

The move is expected in a matter of days.

The move came days after Iran’s Foreign Ministry said it was suspending its uranium enrichment program.

The ministry had also said it would halt its enrichment program, which it said would be a result of a “technical and economic blockade.”

The government has said its goal is to eliminate all centrifuges and reduce its enriched uranium to a level where it can be used for peaceful purposes.

It has also said that Iran is ready to resume uranium enrichment and said it will give a full accounting of its nuclear facilities in a future meeting.

The deal allows for sanctions relief to be lifted once Iran’s foreign minister meets with U.S. President Donald Trump, who is expected next week in New York.

The White House has said Trump will meet with Iranian officials on Thursday.

Under international sanctions imposed after Iran tested a nuclear weapon in 2006, Iran has sought a comprehensive deal with world leaders to prevent it from getting a nuclear bomb.

Under this deal, the United States and the other world powers will impose limits on Iran’s oil and gas exports and other goods and services, impose crippling financial sanctions on Iran, and limit its ability to conduct international transactions.

Iran has said it is ready for talks, but has warned the deal with the U.N. and the international community will have unintended consequences.

It said it has not decided on a timeframe for signing the deal.